Review of “Court of Lions” by Somaiya Daud

Daud, Somaiya. Court of Lions. New York: Flatiron Books, 2020. 

ISBN-13: 978-1250126450 | $18.99 USD | 320 pages | YA Sci-Fi/Fantasy

Blurb

Two identical girls, one a princess, the other a rebel. Who will rule the empire?

After being swept up into the brutal Vathek court, Amani, the ordinary girl forced to serve as the half-Vathek princess’s body double, has been forced into complete isolation. The cruel but complex princess, Maram, with whom Amani had cultivated a tenuous friendship, discovered Amani’s connection to the rebellion and has forced her into silence, and if Amani crosses Maram once more, her identity – and her betrayal – will be revealed to everyone in the court.

Amani is desperate to continue helping the rebellion, to fight for her people’s freedom. But she must make a devastating decision: will she step aside, and watch her people suffer, or continue to aid them, and put herself and her family in mortal danger? And whatever she chooses, can she bear to remain separated, forever, from Maram’s fiancé, Idris? 

In the series

#1 Mirage 

Review 

4 stars 

I received an ARC through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.

This is a wonderful second book in the series. I loved seeing both Amani and Maram come into their own, and both find happiness in spite of what was expected of them.

Let’s start with Maram: I liked what was done with her this time around, particularly that she’s queer. Her relationship with Aghraas was one of the best parts of this book. I didn’t always think much of Maram, dismissing her as another spoiled princess at times, but it was cool to see her have these tender moments. And I also liked seeing her grappling with her mixed heritage, and trying to figure out if she’s the right person for the role of ruler…the internal growth on her part was splendid, as was the development of her relationship with Amani, given it originally started off in a horrible place.

And Amani and Idris’ arc started off with a bit more “will-they-won’t-they” angst for my taste this time, but I was won over by them as a couple as the story went on. 

I enjoyed this book overall, and look forward to what Somaiya Daud releases next. If you’re looking for a  rich, immersive Moroccan inspired fantasy, I recommend this series highly. 

Author Bio

Somaiya Daud was born in a Midwestern city, and spent a large part of her childhood and adolescence moving around. Like most writers, she started when she was young and never really stopped. Her love of all things books propelled her to get a degree in English literature (specializing in the medieval and early modern), and while she worked on her Master’s degree she doubled as a bookseller at Politics and Prose in their children’s department. Determined to remain in school for as long as possible, she packed her bags in 2014 and moved the west coast to pursue a doctoral degree in English literature. Now she’s preparing to write a dissertation on Victorians, rocks, race, and the environment.

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Review of “Poe Dameron: Free Fall” by Alex Segura

Segura, Alex. Star Wars: Poe Dameron: Free Fall. Los Angeles: Disney-Lucasfilm Press, 2020.

ISBN-13: 978-1368051668 | $17.99 USD | 380 pages | YA Sci-Fi

Blurb

Learn more about the dashing hero from the new Star Wars films! Telling a story hinted at in The Rise of Skywalker….

It’s been a few years since Poe’s mother passed away, and Poe and his father, who was a pilot for the Rebellion, have had more and more trouble connecting. Not sure what he wants to do with his life, teenage Poe runs away from home to find adventure, and to figure out what kind of man he is meant to be.

Review 

3.5 stars

I received an ARC through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.

Poe Dameron: Free Fall piqued my interest due to my love for the character and interest in his backstory, particularly since it also involved Zorii, who we were introduced to in Rise of Skywalker. While I’m a staunch FinnPoe shipper, I was willing to be swayed as to the viability of Poe and Zorii as a potential pairing if their history was compelling enough. 

Poe’s story on his own is compelling. I liked learning about his origins prior to joining the Resistance, and how his parents’ role in the prior Rebellion against the Empire impacted him. 

And there are some interesting things done with Zorii’s character too, in terms of giving her a bit of a complex history and past of her own. A secret about her was revealed that I did not anticipate, and I enjoyed the way it was grappled with, to an extent. 

However, I didn’t think much of their relationship, even as friends. I never got the sense they truly connected, not in the way that Finn and Poe did, even with them being apart for the majority of both The Force Awakens and The Last Jedi. That could just be my bias coming through, but their friendship felt very shallow, and there wasn’t a real sense of depth there. 

This is still a fun book, and it will excite other Poe fans who were upset that he wasn’t given that much to do in the sequel trilogy. 

Author Bio

Alex Segura is a novelist and comic book and podcast writer. He is the author of the Anthony Award-nominated Pete Fernandez Miami Mystery series, which includes SILENT CITY, DOWN THE DARKEST STREET, DANGEROUS ENDS, BLACKOUT, and the upcoming MIAMI MIDNIGHT, all via Polis Books. He has also written a number of comic books, including the best-selling and critically acclaimed ARCHIE MEETS KISS storyline, the “Occupy Riverdale” story, ARCHIE MEETS RAMONES and THE ARCHIES one-shot and monthly series. He also co-created and co-wrote the LETHAL LIT podcast for Einhorn’s Epic Productions and iHeart Radio, which was named one of the Five Best Podcasts of 2018 by The New York Times. He lives in New York with his wife and son. He is a Miami native.

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Review of “Deal With the Devil” (Mercenary Librarians #1) by Kit Rocha

Rocha, Kit. Deal with the Devil. New York: Tor, 2020. 

ISBN-13: 978-1250209368 | $17.99 USD | 336 pages | Sci-Fi Romance

Blurb

Deal with the Devil is Orphan Black meets the post-apocalyptic Avengers by USA Today and New York Times bestselling author duo Kit Rocha.

Nina is an information broker with a mission—she and her team of mercenary librarians use their knowledge to save the hopeless in a crumbling America.

Knox is the bitter, battle-weary captain of the Silver Devils. His squad of supersoldiers went AWOL to avoid slaughtering innocents, and now he’s fighting to survive.

They’re on a deadly collision course, and the passion that flares between them only makes it more dangerous. They could burn down the world, destroying each other in the process…

Or they could do the impossible: team up.

This is the first book in a near-future science fiction series with elements of romance.

Review

4 stars

I received an ARC from the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.

While I’m new to Kit Rocha’s work, I was still ridiculously pumped for Deal with the Devil, because of the series title. I mean, Mercenary Librarians?! YES, please! And Bree and Donna are the loveliest people ever on Twitter (Bree in particular for her advocacy of libraries in the wake of the Macmillan library embargo, which is now fortunately in the past…for now), contributing to the hype even more.

And this is…pretty good. It’s apparently set in the same post-apocalyptic world as their other, self published works, but you don’t have to be familiar with those to grasp the semantics of this one. I liked their imagination of what near-future crumbling America might look like, even though it is a bit surreal to read while the world is actually falling apart. 

I flip flopped a bit on the romantic aspect, liking Nina as a strong female lead, but not really feeling overly invested in Knox, or the pairing of the two of them. There’s a lot about the physical/sexual reactions they have to each other, and I wanted a bit more emotional depth to their relationship. 

However, I did like the team as a whole, and the “found family” aspect. And the way we occasionally got insights into different members’ thoughts, while having the majority of the book be centered on Knox and Nina, was well done, ensuring the book felt well balanced. I absolutely cannot wait to see where the follow-up books take them! This book is a fairly solid post apocalyptic romance, and one that I think will please veteran KR readers and new ones alike. 

Author Bio

Kit Rocha is the pseudonym for co-writing team Donna Herren and Bree Bridges. After penning dozens of paranormal novels, novellas and stories as Moira Rogers, they branched out into gritty, sexy dystopian romance.

The Beyond series has appeared on the New York Times and USA Today bestseller lists, has been nominated for best erotic romance in the RT Reviewer’s Choice award five times, and won in 2013 and 2015.

Contact Information

You can contact Bree & Donna at kit@kitrocha.com

Bree & Donna are represented by Sarah Younger at NYLA. For rights inquiries about their books, contact rights@nyliterary.com

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Review of “The Fever King” (Feverwake #1) by Victoria Lee

Lee, Victoria. The Fever King. New York, Skyscape, 2020.

ISBN-13: 978-1542040402 | $9.99 USD | 369 pages | YA Sci-Fi/Fantasy

Blurb

In the former United States, sixteen-year-old Noam Álvaro wakes up in a hospital bed, the sole survivor of the viral magic that killed his family and made him a technopath. His ability to control technology attracts the attention of the minister of defense and thrusts him into the magical elite of the nation of Carolinia.

The son of undocumented immigrants, Noam has spent his life fighting for the rights of refugees fleeing magical outbreaks—refugees Carolinia routinely deports with vicious efficiency. Sensing a way to make change, Noam accepts the minister’s offer to teach him the science behind his magic, secretly planning to use it against the government. But then he meets the minister’s son—cruel, dangerous, and achingly beautiful—and the way forward becomes less clear.

Caught between his purpose and his heart, Noam must decide who he can trust and how far he’s willing to go in pursuit of the greater good.

Review

5 stars

I discovered The Fever King on Twitter, and the book looked promising, and the cheeky answer to a question about queer characters in the book (“Literally every character in The Fever King is queer. All of them. Fight me.) gave me further reason to pick up the book. And while some might say the time for dystopian books has passed, especially now (the fact that this book was published last year, and involves a virus did creep me out a little), I think Lee is one of several fresh voices providing a new take on the genre that is more inclusive and introspective. 

I like that her main characters are multi-faceted, and it’s not just a typical good-vs.-evil deal. Noam, Dara, and Lehrer are all morally ambiguous characters making choices that they think are right, even if they aren’t objectively so from an outsider’s perspective. 

Trauma is depicted with such sensitivity, delving into the harsh realities each of the characters has faced, from Noam in his crusade for immigrant rights and losing those he loves to the virus, and Dara’s own past of being the recipient of abuse. 

I enjoyed this book very much, and I love how it feels so politically and socially relevant in the issues it tackles, while also just being an awesome escapist read. I recommend it to anyone who loves SFF, and is looking for a book that is chock-full of queer characters. 

Author Bio

Victoria Lee grew up in Durham, North Carolina, where she spent twelve ascetic years as a vegetarian before discovering spicy chicken wings are, in fact, a delicacy. She’s been a state finalist competitive pianist, a hitchhiker, a pizza connoisseur, an EMT, an expat in China and Sweden, and a science doctoral student. She’s also a bit of a snob about fancy whisky.

Victoria writes early in the morning, then spends the rest of the day trying to impress her border collie puppy and make her experiments work.

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Review of “Deathless Divide” (Dread Nation #2) by Justina Ireland

Ireland, Justina. Deathless Divide. New York: Balzer & Bray, 2020. 

ISBN-13: 978-0062570635 | $18.99 USD | 551 pages | YA Science Fiction/Alternate History

Blurb

The sequel to Dread Nation is a journey of revenge and salvation across a divided America.

After the fall of Summerland, Jane McKeene hoped her life would get simpler: Get out of town, stay alive, and head west to California to find her mother.

But nothing is easy when you’re a girl trained in putting down the restless dead, and a devastating loss on the road to a protected village called Nicodermus has Jane questioning everything she thought she knew about surviving in 1880’s America.

What’s more, this safe haven is not what it appears – as Jane discovers when she sees familiar faces from Summerland amid this new society. Caught between mysteries and lies, the undead, and her own inner demons, Jane soon finds herself on a dark path of blood and violence that threatens to consume her.

But she won’t be in it alone.

Katherine Deveraux never expected to be allied with Jane McKeene. But after the hell she has endured, she knows friends are hard to come by – and that Jane needs her, too, whether Jane wants to admit it or not.

Watching Jane’s back, however, is more than she bargained for, and when they both reach a breaking point, it’s up to Katherine to keep hope alive – even as she begins to fear that there is no happily-ever-after for girls like her

In the series 

#1 Dread Nation

Review 

4 stars

Having really enjoyed Dread Nation, I was cautiously optimistic about the direction a sequel could go in. However, Deathless Divide is truly epic, a Western with zombies that is both historically rich and incredibly engaging. 

Jane and Katherine are both such great, distinct characters. I love that the girls are strong without falling into the typical YA heroine cliches, particularly with the book focusing so heavily on their friendship. In spite of being separated at one point, they don’t give up on each other.

It is a bit longer than it needs to be and the pacing is  bit odd, especially in terms of conveying the time that has passed during the time jump. However, it’s otherwise a pretty engaging book that continuously left me hungry for more.

I recommend this to anyone who loves any combination of the following (provided they’ve also read Dread Nation): Westerns, zombies, alternate history narratives, and/or Black history. 

Author Bio

Justina Ireland is the author of Dread Nation (Balzer + Bray/HarperCollins), a New York Times bestseller as well as the sequel Deathless Divide. Her earlier works include the fantasy young adult novels Vengeance Bound and Promise of Shadows (both Simon and Schuster).

Justina also writes for the Star Wars franchise, including the books Lando’s Luck, Spark of the Resistance, and the upcoming A Test of Courage, part of the High Republic publishing initiative.

She is the former co-editor in chief of FIYAH Literary Magazine of Black Speculative Fiction, for which she won a World Fantasy Award. She holds a BA from Armstrong Atlantic University and an MFA from Hamline University. 

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Review of “Mirage” (Mirage #1) by Somaiya Daud

Daud, Somaiya. Mirage. New York: Flatiron Books, 2018. 

ISBN-13: 978-1250126429 | $18.99 USD | 311 pages | YA Sci-Fi/Fantasy

Blurb

In a star system dominated by the brutal Vathek empire, eighteen-year-old Amani is a dreamer. She dreams of what life was like before the occupation; she dreams of writing poetry like the old-world poems she adores; she dreams of receiving a sign from Dihya that one day, she, too, will have adventure, and travel beyond her isolated moon.

But when adventure comes for Amani, it is not what she expects: she is kidnapped by the regime and taken in secret to the royal palace, where she discovers that she is nearly identical to the cruel half-Vathek Princess Maram. The princess is so hated by her conquered people that she requires a body double, someone to appear in public as Maram, ready to die in her place.

As Amani is forced into her new role, she can’t help but enjoy the palace’s beauty—and her time with the princess’ fiancé, Idris. But the glitter of the royal court belies a world of violence and fear. If Amani ever wishes to see her family again, she must play the princess to perfection…because one wrong move could lead to her death.

Review

5 stars

Mirage has been on my radar for a while, but it was only getting approved for the forthcoming sequel on NetGalley that finally got me to pick it up. And, as per usual, I’m kicking myself for putting it off. 

The world is stunning, inspired by Moroccan history and exploring the threat of imperial rule and loss of culture. While dealing with a dark topic like the wounds of colonialism, it does so in a way that both pays respect to the real events and allows for some escape into the fantastical, promoting empowerment in the face of adversity. While there are some familiar elements here, Daud gives them her own twist, which had me flying through this book in a single evening. 

And the characters, especially Amani as the lead, are compelling. She has such strength of character and I rooted for her throughout the book. Maram as a villain feels very fleshed out, and like there’s depth to her.

This is a solid YA SFF debut, and I can’t wait to see where Daud takes the series in her next installment. 

Author Bio

Somaiya lives, works, and writes from Seattle, Washington.

In 2018 her debut novel, Mirage, was released in the United States with Flatiron Books and the United Kingdom with Hodder & Stoughton. It was hailed as “poetically written”, “immersive and captivating” and “beautiful and necessary” by The School Library Journal, Booklist and Entertainment Weekly. Mirage has been shortlisted for the Children’s Africana Book Award and the Arab American Book Award. In 2020 Somaiya received her PhD in English Literature studies with a focus on world literature and nineteenth-century orientalism. She is available for speaking engagements.

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Review of “Chaos Reigning” (Consortium Rebellion #3) by Jessie Mihalik

Mihalik, Jessie. Chaos Reigning. New York: Harper Voyager, 2020. 

ISBN-13; 978-0062802422 | $16.99 USD | 416 pages | Science Fiction—Space Opera

Blurb

Interplanetary intrigue and romance combine in this electrifying finale to the Consortium Rebellion series.

As the youngest member of her High House, Catarina von Hasenberg is used to being underestimated, but her youth and flighty, bubbly personality mask a clever mind and stubborn determination. Her enemies, blind to her true strength, do not suspect that Cat is a spy—which makes her the perfect candidate to go undercover at a rival House’s summer retreat to gather intelligence on their recent treachery.

Cat’s overprotective older sister reluctantly agrees, but on one condition: Cat cannot go alone. Alexander Sterling, a quiet, gorgeous bodyguard, will accompany her, posing as her lover. After Cat tries, and fails, to ditch Alex, she grudgingly agrees, confident in her ability to manage him. After all, she’s never found a person she can’t manipulate.

But Alex proves more difficult—and more desirable—than Cat anticipated. When she’s attacked and nearly killed, she and Alex are forced to work together to figure out how deep the treason goes. With rumors of widespread assaults on Serenity raging, communications down, and the rest of her family trapped off-planet, Catarina must persuade Alex to return to Earth to expose the truth and finish this deadly battle once and for all.

But Cat can’t explain why she’s the perfect person to infiltrate hostile territory without revealing secrets she’d rather keep buried. . . .

In the series

#1 Polaris Rising 

#2 Aurora Blazing

Review

4 stars

I received an ARC from the publisher via Edelweiss+ in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own. 

I enjoyed the first two Consortium Rebellion books for what they were, but Chaos Reigning is probably my favorite. I love characters who, despite being underestimated, come to surprise you by being super competent, and that’s Cat to a tee. I like that there’s also the factor of her relationship with her family here, something I wanted to be fleshed out more prior, and how they don’t expect much of her. 

Alex also plays a role in my enjoyment, being a sweet, yet still protective love interest. However, as with the previous books, the romance isn’t as much of a focus, and I feel like this one had the least emphasis on that aspect. However, the bits we get still made their relationship my favorite of the series. 

I continue to enjoy the intricate space-opera politics of this world, especially as far as each character plays their role in it trying to improve things in the Consortium for both themselves and the family, as well as for the greater good. While this series is over, I would not be opposed to exploring more of the Consortium in the future, if Mihalik was interested in writing more.

This is a solid conclusion to a debut sci-fi trilogy, and one I recommend to fans of the series, as well as anyone who likes sci-fi with light romantic elements. 

Author Bio

Jessie Mihalik is the author of the first two books in the Consortium Rebellion trilogy, Polaris Rising and Aurora Blazing. A software engineer by trade, she has a degree in Computer Science and a love of all things geeky. Jessie now writes full-time from her home in Central Texas, and when not writing, can be found playing co-op videogames with her husband, trying out new board games, hiking, or reading.

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Review of “Goldilocks” by Laura Lam

Lam, Laura. Goldilocks. New York: Orbit, 2020. 

ISBN-13: 978-0316462860 | $27.00 USD | 352 pages | Science Fiction

Blurb

A gripping science fiction thriller where five women task themselves with ensuring the survival of the human race; perfect for readers of The MartianThe Power, and Station Eleven.
Despite increasing restrictions on the freedoms of women on Earth, Valerie Black is spearheading the first all-female mission to a planet in the Goldilocks Zone, where conditions are just right for human habitation.
It’s humanity’s last hope for survival, and Naomi, Valerie’s surrogate daughter and the ship’s botanist, has been waiting her whole life for an opportunity like this – to step out of Valerie’s shadow and really make a difference.
But when things start going wrong on the ship, Naomi begins to suspect that someone on board is concealing a terrible secret – and realizes time for life on Earth may be running out faster than they feared . . .
Goldilocks is The Handmaid’s Tale meets The Martian – a bold and thought-provoking new high-concept thriller.

Review 

3 stars

I received an ARC from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.

Goldilocks was another random find, and I was intrigued by the concept of a story that both dealt with the familiar elements of dealing with a deadly virus and working to find a way to build life on another planet, as well as the more unique aspect of discussing women’s issues within that context. 

Lam does a pretty good job with some of it. She masters the delicate balance of accuracy/attention to detail and managing to convey it so you don’t have to have an interest in science to enjoy the book. 

And she does get some elements of the characterization right. Valerie, Naomi’s mentor, has the most complex motivations, and I felt like she was the best drawn out of the cast with her moral ambiguity, leading to some important questions we would have to ponder in a similar situation. 

I didn’t much care for the protagonist, Naomi, however. There are glimmers of the “women’s rights” aspect in her narrative, but I was never given a real reason to root for her, or any of the other characters for that matter. 

I didn’t 100% love this one, but I do like that Lam tried to discuss difficult topics with this book, even if the execution didn’t totally work. I’d still recommend giving this one a try if you like science fiction, especially stories about space travel. 

Author Bio

Laura Lam was born in the late eighties and raised near San Francisco, California, by two former Haight-Ashbury hippies.

After studying literature and creative writing at university, she relocated to Scotland to be with the partner she met online when they were teenagers and he insulted her taste in books and she insulted his right back. She is now a dual citizen, but at times she misses the sunshine.

While working a variety of jobs, she began writing. Pantomime, the first book in the award winning Micah Grey series, was released in 2013. Robin Hobb says “Pantomime by Laura Lam took me into a detailed and exotic world, peopled by characters that I’d love to be friends with . . . and some I’d never want to cross paths with.” The rest of the series is Shadowplay, Masquerade, and the Vestigial Tales.

Her near future cyberpunk thrillers include False Hearts and Shattered Minds. Her short work has appeared in Scotland in Space, Nasty Women, Solaris Rising 3, Cranky Ladies of History, and more. She also writes f/f romance as Laura Ambrose.

Her 2020 releases include Goldilocks, about the first all-female mission to an exosolar planet, and Seven Devils, co-written with Elizabeth May, which is about a group of women smashing a patriarchal evil empire in space.

She is still hiding from sunshine in Scotland where she lectures in creative writing at Napier University and writes more stories. 

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Review of “Sisters of the Perilous Heart” (Mortal Heritance #1) by Sandra L. Vasher

Vasher, Sandra L. Sisters of the Perilous Heart. 2018. Raleigh, NC: Mortal Ink Press, LLC, 2020. 

ISBN-13: 978-19509010 | $5.99 USD | 395 pages | YA Science Fantasy

Blurb

As the last mortal kingdom of Kepler resists the Immortal Empire, its young queen faces a devastating attack. Queen Vivian is two minutes into her reign when an arrow pierces her heart and infects her with the Immortality Virus. But she has too much magic to become immortal and not enough to survive. She must find more magic fast, or she’ll die.

Meanwhile, another young mortal faces an uncertain future of her own. Carina is fleeing for her life, but her magic is a tracking beam for immortals. She must learn to harness and control it, or she’ll be captured and killed. Then she meets the queen of South Kepler.

Vivian needs Carina’s magic, and she can offer safe haven in exchange. But can Vivian trust this common girl? Carina isn’t on the kingdom’s registry of magicians. What if she’s a Northern rebel? A spy for the Immortal Empire? And will the truth be revealed in time to save them both?

Sisters of the Perilous Heart is Book One of the Mortal Heritance.

Review 

4 stars

I received an ARC from the author/publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.

I picked up Sisters of the Perilous Heart on the strength of its attention grabbing premise, and I think there’s a lot of potential here. It’s a compelling and complex mix of dystopian, futuristic, and fantasy elements. 

I enjoyed the two main characters, Vivian and Carina, the former in particular as she goes on a journey of trying to find a cure for the Immortality Virus, and I think it’s great that it gives her some complex motivations and a place to evolve from over the course of the story. 

Carina’s story forms a great contrast, as she’s only growing into her powers, although I was a bit less invested in her story. She does have a cute romance that develops over the course of her arc though, so that’s a plus. 

One of the aspects I really liked was the use of clippings from books to help illustrate the world building. As a history buff, I love when fictional worlds have as much depth put into their history, to the point of their being written records, and the way it feeds into slowly proving insight into the world building and the magic is great. 

I really enjoyed this, and I can’t wait to see where this series goes from here. I recommend this to anyone who likes stories with a mix of sci-fi and fantasy. 

Author Bio

Sandra L. Vasher is an indie writer, recovering lawyer, dreamer, consultant, blogger, serial entrepreneur, and mommy of very spoiled dog. She enjoys long drives in fall weather, do-it-yourself projects, animated movies and cartoons, fanfiction, red wine, traveling everywhere, and baking sweet and savory treats. She can often be found trying not to hunch over her computer at her favorite coffee shops in Raleigh, North Carolina. Follow her online at sandyvasher.com.

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Review of “Starbreaker (Endeavor #2) by Amanda Bouchet

Bouchet, Amanda. Starbreaker. Naperville, IL: Sourcebooks Casablanca, 2020. 

ISBN-13: 978-1492667162 (mass market)/978-1492667179 (ebook) | $7.99 USD (mass market/$7.49 (eBook)  | 448 pages | Sci-Fi Romance

Blurb

THEY NEVER WANTED TO BE HEROES

Captain Tess Bailey and Shade Ganavan are still the galaxy’s Most Wanted, and with revolution in the wind and the universe on the brink of catastrophic war, the situation couldn’t be more desperate. Despite the Dark Watch scouring the known sectors for them, rebel leaders have handed the crew of the Endeavor a delicate and dangerous mission: break into Starbase 12 and free renowned scientist Reena Ahern. She’s the only one who stands a chance of tipping the odds in their favor for the first time in decades.

BUT PULLING OFF THE IMPOSSIBLE IS WHAT THEY DO BEST

The clock is ticking. But as their attraction builds and secrets are revealed, Tess and Shade must decide if they trust each other enough to execute this impossible prison break. They could change the course of history, but they’ll be risking everything… They’ll just have to tackle one crisis at a time.

In the series

#1 Nightchaser

Review

5 stars 

I received an ARC from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own. 

After a successful start with Nightchaser, the series remains strong (and perhaps gets even better) with its second installment, Starbreaker. It delivers on the premise of the first book, being an awesome space opera thrill ride from start to finish. The one shortcoming is that I did read book one so long ago that I remember so little of it; however it didn’t take me long to end up back in the swing of things with Tess and Shade and the rest of the crew. 

One of the things I enjoyed was that Tess and Shade are very much a couple in this one, and while there are some issues of trust  between them, it’s refreshing to not have to deal with multi-book angst of “will-they-won’t-they.” 

I liked seeing more of the secondary characters and the world as well, especially with the fact that Tess and Shade remain Most Wanted, and they’re pulling off another dangerous mission. 

This book is an absolute delight, both in its own right and as a continuation of the adventures of the crew of the Endeavor. If you loved the first book, I definitely recommend picking up this one. 

Author Bio

Amanda Bouchet grew up in New England where she spent much of her time tromping around in the woods and making up grand adventures in her head. It was inevitable that one day she would start writing them down. Drawing on her Greek heritage for the setting and on her love of all things daring and romantic for the rest, her debut trilogy, The Kingmaker Chronicles, took form. She writes what she loves to read: epic exploits, steamy romance, and characters that make you laugh and cry.

Her first novel, A Promise of Fire, won several Romance Writers of America chapter contests, including the Orange Rose Contest and the paranormal category of the prestigious Golden Pen.

Amanda is a French master’s graduate and former English teacher. She lives in Paris, France with her two bilingual children who will soon be correcting her French.

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