Review of “‘Til Death Do Us Part” by Amanda Quick

Quick, Amanda. ‘Til Death Do Us Part. New York: Berkley, 2016. ISBN-13: 978-0-399-17446-9. Hardcover List Price: $27.00. Paperback List Price: $7.99.

3.5 stars

I had heard a lot about Amanda Quick (one of the main alter-egos of author Jayne Ann Krentz) over the years, but I was not tempted to try her work until a recent trip to the library, where I found myself looking for new authors. I used to enjoy thrillers, like The Da Vinci Code, and I was intrigued by the premise of this one.

As a mystery, it did not disappoint. Despite mostly reading romance these days, I have a weird fascination with stories that deal with jealousy, obsession, and murder. I thought initially that the first chapter made it incredibly obvious that one of the first two characters we meet would be the culprit, only to be proven wrong as the story unfolded. and I began to piece together all the evidence along with the characters.

However, as a romance, I found it a bit lacking. I didn’t sense much chemistry between Trent and Calista, and despite the scenes where they make love not being described too explicitly, they feel awkward and out of place.

However, they each have intriguing qualities on their own. I sense that Krentz/Quick channeled her own experience from her career as an author when writing Trent, as he often talks about how “everyone’s a critic,” and other comments along similar lines. Calista is a career woman in a rather unconventional profession.

Despite this being a stand alone, I would be interested if she wrote another book about Andrew, following some of his detective adventures, which begin at the conclusion of this one, or Eudora, as she continues to pursue her relationship with Mr. Tazewell.

 

 

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